MYTH 1: LISTED BUILDING CONSENT FOR ALTERATIONS TO A LISTED BUILDING IS ONLY NEEDED FOR EXTERNAL CHANGES

​This is perhaps the most common urban myth surrounding listed buildings. Listed Building Consent will be required for the majority of alterations (internal AND/OR external) whether the elements of the proposals are mentioned in the listing or not, irrespective of the grade.

This also applies to alterations undertaken after the building was listed, although straightforward changes here are more likely to be acceptable.

The listing process was introduced in the Town and Country Planning Act of 1947, so has now been in place for 70 years. There are three grades of listings in England and Wales (Northern Ireland has more, with sub-divisions):

* Grade I (Grade A in Scotland) are those with ‘exceptional interest’.

* Grade II* (Grade B in Scotland) are those that are ‘particularly important … and of more than special interest’.

* Grade II (Grade C in Scotland) are those with ‘special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them’.

 

Grade II buildings/structures are therefore most common and account for around 92% of the listed building stock within the UK. Consent decisions will be based on significance and on a case-by-case basis.

Any changes that could affect the character of the building or structure will need consent, although minor repairs will not require an application.

The definition of a ‘repair’ is, however, a grey area, so early consultation with your Conservation Officer/Local Authority is always recommended.

Full lists of all listed buildings within Wales can be found here http://www.coflein.gov.uk/